Healthy springtime fare: Peach, plum and apricot crisp

Photo courtesy of Jitze Couperus/flickr

Photo courtesy of Jitze Couperus/flickr

The inspirational advent of spring brings a variety of glorious bounties from Mother Nature.

In addition to the springtime presence of an eclectic array of experiences including frogs croaking, melodious birdsong, and colorful budding flowers, it also provides a healthful selection of seasonal fruits.

Peaches, plums and apricots are a beautiful sight to behold at any local grocer or farmer’s market.

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Moore’s first-person portrayal of early-onset Alzheimer’s jolts awareness

Actress Julianne Moore’s Oscar-winning performance as Alice, in the movie “Still Alice,” is a big win for the awareness of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

Based on the book written by neuroscientist turned novelist, Dr. Lisa Genova, Moore’s character was inspired by Genova’s personal experience of being a granddaughter of a grandmother who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 80.

According to Genova, in an interview with CBS News, in addition to conducting brain research with a professional neuroscientist, “I found what was lacking is an understanding of what it feels like to have it.”

Unlike Genova’s grandmother, Moore’s character Alice develops early-onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 50.

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2015 Oscars affirm an inner yearning for authenticity

Photo courtesy of ABC, Sunday's Academy Award network host

Photo courtesy of ABC, Sunday’s Academy Award network host

There was a powerful message subliminally communicated throughout the recent Academy Awards show.

Amid the recent Oscar buzz, excitement, Sunday night awards and celebrations which followed, it is undeniable that six out of the eight Best Picture awards nominations were based in full or in part on a true story.

Read the full article on Laurie’s column at LifeCycles in the Communities Digital News »

Beyond Valentine’s Day: A matter of heart

Photos courtesy of Britt-knee/flickr

Photo courtesy of Britt-knee/flickr

As Valentine’s Day celebrations come to an end, senses have become heightened with the romantic promise of true love.

The inundation of bright red hearts all around on Valentine’s Day becomes a lasting memory, remaining immortalized as the undisputed symbol of love itself.

A human heart requires nurturing, attention and care if it is to be healthy and fully functioning.

Heart disease is the number one killer of both women and men in the United States.

Read the full article on Laurie’s column at LifeCycles in the Communities Digital News »

Southern Caregiver Resource Center’s Donor Recognition Program

Thanks to Southern Caregiver Resource Center for recognizing our support at your February 5th Donor Recognition Program event!

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Recipe for the heart: Valentine’s Day chocolate nut clusters

Photos courtesy of Arria Belli, Jackie/flickr

Photos courtesy of Arria Belli, Jackie/flickr

Observed on February 14 each year, Valentine’s Day is celebrated worldwide as a special day for expressing romantic love.

Greeting cards, flowers and chocolates are popular Valentine’s Day tokens of love which are freely given from the heart without expectation of reciprocation.

Poet and philosopher Kahlil Gibran may have described the spirit of selfless Valentine’s Day giving in his words,

“Love gives naught but itself and takes
naught but from itself.”

However selfless true love may be, there is no doubt that a gift of chocolate ranks among the top as a prized gift to receive on Valentine’s Day!

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Laurie Edwards-Tate Finalist for Most Admired CEO 2015

“Thank you San Diego Business Journal for honoring me as a finalist, Most Admired CEO!” – Laurie Edwards-Tate, President and CEO, At Your Home Familycare

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Beyond multivitamins: Probiotics

Photos courtesy of Ben Sutherland, Diego, Meal Makeover Moms, Stacy Spensley/flickr

Photos courtesy of Ben Sutherland, Diego, Meal Makeover Moms, Stacy Spensley/flickr

Probiotics are “friendly” microorganisms which are similar to those naturally living in the human body.

The trillions of friendly bacteria which exist in and on the human body are those bacteria our bodies depend on to help digest our food, produce some vitamins we depend on, maintain the health of our skin, inhibit the growth of bacterial pathogens, and numerous other tasks in the human microbiome. The word “probiotic” is derived from the Latin “pro,” meaning for, and “biota,” meaning life.

Probiotic literally means “for life.”

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Beyond multivitamins: Vitamin D supplementation

Photo courtesy of Health Gauge/flickr

Photo courtesy of Health Gauge/flickr

Vitamin D is produced in the body primarily through exposure to sunlight. For Americans who live in the northern portion of the U.S., getting the right amount of sunlight can be challenging!

Vitamin D is necessary for the human body to metabolize important minerals such as phosphorous and calcium. Moreover, it plays a critical role in ensuring strong bones, healthy skin, proper cellular function and a strong immune system.

Vegans, those who avoid or have limited sun exposure, wear sunscreen regularly, have dark skin, are plagued by gastric or bowel distress, take steroidal medication, or are older adults are at greater risk for vitamin D deficiency.

Read the full article on Laurie’s column at LifeCycles in the Communities Digital News »

Beyond multivitamins: Omega-3 fatty acids

Photo courtesy of Camilo Rueda López/flickr

Photo courtesy of Camilo Rueda López/flickr

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients necessary for overall good health.

They are not commonly found in a standard multivitamin but are critically involved in many functions of the human body.

Omega-3 fatty acids are of three major types:

  1. Alpha-linolenic (ALA)
  2. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA)
  3. Docosahexaenoic (DHA)

They were first discovered in the 1950’s by Johanna Budwig, PhD., a German scientist, and she incorporated them into a nutrient-rich diet administered to her cancer patients.

According to the American Cancer Society, thousands of patients who were treated with Dr. Budwig’s nutrient-packed diet experienced reduction in tumor progression or other significant health improvements.

The case for consuming adequate amounts of food which are high in omega-3 fatty acids is compelling.

Read the full article on Laurie’s column at LifeCycles in the Communities Digital News »